Betting on the CPSC–never a sure bet

Earlier this week the Senate Commerce Committee had a marathon confirmation hearing with several subcabinet nominees from various federal agencies.  The hearing included in this disparate group Commissioner Robert Adler who has been nominated for a second seven year term on the CPSC.  Because of the number of nominees before the Committee and votes on the Senate floor, the hearing was rather truncated without much probing of Commissioner Adler’s views on issues before the CPSC.

Nevertheless, Senator Thune, the senior Republican on the Committee, did ask Commissioner Adler to explain the agency’s delay in implementing PL 112-28, which directed the agency to work to reduce the costs of third party testing.  Senator Thune made similar inquiries with the two earlier nominees, demonstrating that he has concerns with the manner that the agency is implementing the law.

Commissioner Adler’s response to Senator Thune was both interesting and disturbing for at least two reasons.  First, Commissioner Adler said that because of the way the law is written, it is “not easy to come up with” constructive ways to reduce burdens.  Huh?!  The public has presented many suggestions over the years as has the agency staff.  What is not easy is to get the Commission to devote the staff resources to get the job done.  This is a problem of the Commission’s own making and clearly the Commission does not want to clean up after itself—to do so would implicate several of the rules the agency put in place without regard to the burdens them impose.  The Congress told the CPSC that if it needed additional authorities to get the job done, then it was to come back to Congress with a request for tool to do the job.  No such report has been sent.  In other words, it is too hard to do the job, but the agency will not ask for what it needs to do the job.  In the meantime, scare resources are being spent on testing that does not advance safety.

Second, to demonstrate his commitment to carrying out Congressional direction, Commission Adler pointed to the one proceeding the agency has ongoing to address burden reduction.  This proceeding is to come up with “determinations” that certain products do not and cannot contain phthalates and various heavy metals.  This determinations proceeding, first suggested in 2011, finds precedent in similar action the agency took in 2009 to determine certain materials did not contain lead and so did not require testing.  However, the lead determinations took the agency a matter of months to put in place not the years that the current proceeding is eating up.

Commission Adler also stated that the determinations will solve the problem saying that the “small businesses I have talked to want expanded determinations” as if this is all they want.  Of course, if you are a small business making toys out of natural wood, you do not want to have to test for phthalates and heavy metals when you know they are not present.  That is pretty obvious. However, there are many other small businesses who look to the federal government not to put in place regulations that impose costs without added safety benefits; who want the federal government to consider laws in other jurisdictions and minimize repetitive testing; and who want to be able to have manufacturing processes that are flexible enough to meet market demands without having to stop to do third party testing when this does not add to safety but does impact their bottom line and their ability to expand and create jobs.

If confirmed, Commissioner Adler will be in office until 2021.  I was thinking about starting a pool on whether the agency will actually complete meaningful action to reduce testing burdens before his new term expires.  But given the agency’s pace and progress so far, betting on the agency to act is not a sure bet.

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2 Responses to “Betting on the CPSC–never a sure bet”


  1. 1 Steve June 13, 2014 at 12:04 pm

    Government at all levels often seeks public input on actions they take. It is supposedly read but then the agency does what it wants. This is not just at the CPSC. This is a common problem. The problem is in essence that people in the government sector think they are the only ones with good ideas or that they are somehow uniquely situated to be the only ones with the ability to “solve a problem”. Or they have an “us” vs “them” mentality where the thought is that the “little people” (the regulated ones) are only trying to “manipulate” the agency for their own gain. Its why when you ask bureaucrats to explain why the private sector idea was discarded they never have a good reason other than “the bureaucrats idea was much better as [insert some fake reason using govt. speak here]”. “The most terrifying words in the English language: I’m from the government and I’m here to help.”
    – Ronald Reagan

  2. 2 Northup, Anne June 13, 2014 at 12:00 pm

    Good job!


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