Double Entendre

Voluntary recalls are one of the main things that this agency does. We at the CPSC work with a company to get a potentially (or actually) dangerous product out of consumers’ hands. (Or that’s what it should be—sometimes the meaning of “recall” is squishy around here. See my blog post here for more details.) So everyone who works with the agency should be paying close attention to the draft interpretive rule that the Commission is considering.

We held a briefing on the draft yesterday, and what I heard concerned me. As staff explained it, the purpose of this draft is to give firms—and agency staff—“greater predictability” in working through the content of voluntary recall notices. To me, this sounds like we are considering a rule that would impose strictures tantamount to requirements that would limit the ability of the agency and a company to work collaboratively to design the most effective recall possible. When I pressed the staff on this point, I received assurances that the rule would not impose requirements, but would simply represent guidance from the Commission.

Balderdash. Citing “more efficient negotiations” is simply a way of saying that points of negotiation that traditionally have been on the table should be taken off. And “guidance from the Commission,” even “nonbinding” guidance, will translate into take-it-or-leave-it offers to companies. At a minimum, if the current draft is adopted, companies can expect that they will have to cite extraordinary justifications to deviate from the guidance.

I am not sure that this is a good idea. Recalls occur for many reasons, and the effort required to develop a good recall ensures that each recall is tailored to the circumstances. Some recalls will require broad notice, others may require only direct notice to affected consumers. (A side note: I am happy that the staff draft acknowledges that direct notice is the most effective method to inform consumers about a recall. Such notice is increasingly feasible in an age of Internet shopping.) Some recalls may not even be recalls. The elements laid out in the draft rule are troubling, because they cover such a broad swath of territory.

The draft interpretive rule would encourage staff to require companies to implement compliance plans as part of corrective action plans. While this may sometimes be appropriate, I question whether this is necessary or appropriate at the recall stage. That subject is usually more appropriate for negotiation after the recall, because it will often require more analysis than can feasibly be done when trying to get recall out.

In sum, I have many concerns about this draft of the voluntary recall rule. We are scheduled to vote on this notice of proposed rulemaking on October 23, 2013.  In the meantime, I will be working with my colleagues to improve it, and look forward to seeing the public’s comments on it, assuming the Commission approves the draft proposal.

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