Archive for January, 2014

The $57 Million Shakedown

The CPSC’s action to force a recall of Buckyballs–small powerful magnets the Commission believes to be unsafe but which are still being legally sold by others—has raised many serious questions about whether the agency acted properly.  But its efforts to blow up the concept of limited liability by individually suing one of the company’s founders–absent any allegation of wrongdoing–has elevated this action into one that could impact all businesses. 

Recently Craig Zucker, a founder of the now-defunct company that sold Buckyballs and the object of CPSC’s ire, and I discussed this case with the U.S. Chamber of Commerce. Calling the long-term implications of this case shocking, the Chamber has now produced a video that details the concerns this case poses for American businesses.  As a former safety regulator, a mother and, of course, a consumer, I strongly believe the agency could have addressed any safety concerns with this product without the unprecedented overreach taken in this case.

Go to FreeEnterprise.com to see the video for yourself.  Here is a link:

The Side Effects of Tweaking

Much has been written here and in other publications about the substantive impacts of the CPSC’s proposed changes to the rules dealing with voluntary recalls.  The substantive nature of the proposed amendments cannot be discounted even though certain commissioners persist in describing them as only “tweaks.”

As commenters analyze the impacts of the proposed changes, it is important to look at how these changes impact other rules that stakeholders and the commission operate under, specifically those dealing with submission of information under §15(b) and disclosure of information under §6(b) of the Consumer Product Safety Act.  Former CPSC general counsel Cheryl Falvey has written an interesting piece that discusses that interrelationship.  It is worth reading and thinking about.

Information submitted to the agency under §15(b) is exempt from disclosure except under limited circumstances as described in §6(b)(5).  This protection is to provide incentive for companies to fully report information the agency needs to analyze a risk without having to worry that sensitive product information is made public unfairly or prematurely.  One of the exemptions to this protection is when the Commission has accepted in writing a “remedial settlement agreement” (see §6(b)(5)(B)).

Here is the question:  is the voluntary recall (or specifically the recall’s corrective action plan) a remedial settlement agreement?  The regulations currently say that the recall agreement is not enforceable.  The agency now proposes to make the recall agreement enforceable.  Is the effect of that to make any information submitted under §15(b) subject to disclosure where it otherwise would not have been?

What is the Commission’s current position on this issue?  Reading the NPR or listening to the debate does not provide any answers.  But one thing is clear:  with all this tweaking, some transparency is called for.

§6(b): Get Ready for More “Tweaking”

Rumor has it that the CPSC staff will soon be sending up to the Commission suggestions for “modernizing” the §6(b) regulations (16 CFR 1101) dealing with disclosure oftweak image company and product-specific information. “Modernizing” is a word that covers a lot of ground and it will be instructive to see how the agency staff and commissioners define it.

The §6(b) regulations were written in 1983 and do not, for example, contemplate communication by email—hence the perceived need for modernization. But if the Commission’s recent proposal with respect to voluntary recalls—where significant substantive changes are being proposed under the rubric of “tweaking” an interpretive rule—are any indicator, then interested stakeholders should pay close attention to the proposed §6(b) rule when it comes up for Commission review.

§6(b), along with §15(b) and the voluntary recall process are three legs of the stool that supports a collaborative and cooperative relationship between the Commission and product sellers.  This cooperation, in large part, is what makes the agency as effective as it is.  §15(b) requires submission of information indicating a product hazard, but most companies, up to now, heed the oft-stated advice of “when in doubt, report”, reporting information before, or even absent, the statutory obligation.   This happens because §6(b) protects the disclosure of information that is not fair or accurate.  (Here is a link to an article that discusses the consumer protection aspects of §6(b).) Taken together, the statute provides incentives for companies to give information to the agency earlier than they otherwise would because those companies have the assurance that information about specific products will be used internally but will not be prematurely released to the public, before the agency has determined if there is a problem.  The voluntary recall process compliments this statutory framework by allowing recalls to be made quickly and, in some cases, before there is a determination that a substantial hazard does, in fact, exist.

The important role that §6(b) plays in making the statute work is not appreciated by some within the agency.  That is unfortunate.  If the Commission decides to use this proposed §6(b) modernization rule as an opportunity to make more substantial changes (as it did with the voluntary recall proposed rule), it threatens to further erode the foundation of cooperation that is so vital to an effective CPSC.


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