Archive for November, 2014

Seeking the Promise in Compromise

In an especially insightful column this past week, political analyst Michael Gerson noted that often policy-making is as much about methods as it isimages about outcomes. The manner in which things get resolved can often leave them unresolved or at least leave them festering.   He, of course, was talking about the dynamics between the President and the Congress and the brewing ideological storm looming on the horizon about to be seeded to the saturation point by aggressive use of executive orders. Yet, as I read his column, I could not help but wonder what would happen if, in one small corner of government, public servants actually worked hard and honestly to seek compromise rather than steamroll through an ideological result because they can.  Of course I was thinking about the CPSC.  Oh, how naïve of me.

After four years when little effort was made to accommodate differing views in order to reach consensus, new leadership and a roster of four out of five commissioners new to the agency offered the potential for real change. And an early effort by Chairman Kaye and Commissioner Mohorovic gave hope to the notion that perhaps that new territory—the elusive middle ground—could be profitably explored.  Kaye and Mohorovic were both asked by Senator Thune during their confirmation hearing for concrete plans to reduce testing costs and burdens currently being imposed by the agency, and the two put their heads together and came up with a joint response to the Senator.  Up to this point, the Commission has done nothing except talk about how hard it is to do anything—neatly forgetting that when it put the testing rules in place that are now driving those costs, its own economists told it that the costs of those rules would be unsustainable for many businesses.  Even when asked by Congress to address these costs, the Commission’s activities have consisted of foot-dragging tactics cloaked in enough bureaucratic jargon to make even the most cynical panjandrum shake his head in wonder.

Chairman Kaye and Commissioner Mohorovic, however, did come up with three specific additional recommendations that, if implemented, actually might reduce the testing burdens now being imposed by the Commission.  Admittedly, what the two proposed is still quite modest—thin gruel but still some nutrition.  Yet I cannot help but think that if each had written an individual letter, those letters would have been quite different—one more expansive and one less so.  The point is that, presumably, the two were able to accommodate their differing views to get to a consensus.   (But since nothing substantive has been done to drive forward the ideas articulated in the letter, it remains to be seen whether they are merely words on paper, like the rest of the agency’s burden reduction efforts, or whether there is anything real behind them.)

My hope in thinking that perhaps a new effort at consensus building was alive and well at the CPSC was dashed a couple of weeks ago when the agency voted to propose a rule to regulate recreational off-road vehicles (ROV’s). The agency and the industry have been working on safety issues associated with ROV’s for many years. These issues are perhaps the most complex that the agency has ever been presented with and, hence, are not easily resolved.  The industry has developed and recently revised a voluntary standard even as the agency staff worked to write a proposed mandatory standard.  When the proposed standard was made public shortly before the Commission was scheduled to vote on whether to issue it for public comment, the industry engineers met with the staff to discuss various technical issues presented by the draft, an effort which staff agreed was productive. Rather than make further attempts to work through these technical issues, three Commissioners chose to vote to issue the notice of proposed rulemaking. The result was a 3 to 2 vote, along party lines, to issue a proposed rule that is probably not the best work product the agency could have put out.  An amendment to delay the vote by 90 days to give the technical experts the opportunity to work through the issues raised was defeated, again along party lines.

If the leadership of the agency was serious about trying to compromise, then agreeing to this amendment would have been a no-brainer.  If issues could have been resolved, or at least clarified, in that 90 day period, then efficiencies would have been gained. If not, then the industry’s hand would have been called.  Either way, no one can make a credible argument that a rulemaking this complex and potentially lengthy would be so delayed as to jeopardize safety.  A controversial issue would have been diffused, the dissenting commissioners would perhaps have a harder time voting against the NPR; complex technical issues may have been clarified with a resulting better proposed rule—all around a win-win.

Finding consensus and reaching a compromise is very hard work.  If you are in the minority, sometimes achieving small wins may not feel as satisfying as keeping to your principles.  Yet small wins can still be wins.  But when you are in the majority, compromise means that you have to be willing to try to reach common ground even your vote count says you do not need to and when the temptation to jump on the steamroller is strong.  As we are seeing, finding the promise in compromise is not an easy thing to do.


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