Archive for the 'flame retardants' Category

A Few More Bites at the Apple

Next week the CPSC Commissioners will hold a hearing on whether to grant a petition to ban a wide range of consumer products containing organohalogen flame retardants (OFRs).  The petition, filed in 2015, is overly board and seeks to treat in the same way a wide class of chemicals that differ one from another. It seeks to ban a broad range of consumer products with OFRs that vary in use and exposure patterns. It seeks a ban in spite of the fact that the scientific data to justify this action is, charitably, sketchy at best. For these and many other reasons, the petition, on its face, presents sufficient reason for denial.  (See here.)

Nevertheless, the agency held a hearing on the petition in late 2015, put it out for public comment, and has devoted a considerable amount of staff resource to considering the issues presented by the petition.  After a thorough examination of the data in the petition, the hearing record and the public comments, in May the agency staff recommended that the petition be denied for a variety of reasons.  In spite of all this, the Commissioners apparently do not believe that they have sufficient information to make up their minds on the matter and so are having yet another hearing.

It is not clear what this hearing is intended to accomplish, other than to give the petitioners another chance to explain why the agency staff was in error in its conclusions. Presumably some Commissioners will offer helpful hints on how to recast the petition to avoid the shortcomings identified.  Perhaps there will be some conversation about why the petitioners brought the issue to the CPSC when it is more properly before the EPA.  No doubt some on the dais will decry the statutory requirement to balance risks with costs, a requirement the petitioners cannot come close to meeting.

While the hearing will be interesting, one wonders why the agency has devoted such a significant level of resource to this activity.  If the Commissioners vote to overrule their staff and grant the petition, then the level of activity required for rulemaking would have the agency busy for years to come.  If the Commissioners agree with the staff and vote to deny the petition, then what was the point of the hearing?  Among other things, it certainly raises questions about the stewardship of public resources.

 

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