Archive for the 'Import Surveillance' Category

Measure Twice; Cut Once

A couple of years ago, I did an addition to my house.  Everyone who has done this knows the steps.  I sat down with an

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

architect to discuss exactly what I wanted to accomplish with the project.   A rough design was done and then refined in a set of blueprints that was put out for bid.  Since my budget was limited, the plans had to be readjusted to fit both my needs and my resources before they could be finalized.  Only then did we go to the relevant regulatory bodies to seek the required permits and approvals to do the project.

I thought of this process last week while I listened to the CPSC Chairman and Commissioners describe their desire to greatly expand the agency’s import surveillance system at an oversight hearing before the Senate Commerce Committee.   In 2011, in response to Congressional direction, the agency initiated a pilot program to identify imports that violate safety standards.  The current pilot program subjects certain products from certain countries/suppliers to surveillance prior to import under a computer rule set that predicts the possibility of violations. In other words, the computer looks at what is coming in and, using the rule set, flags those products that should be further examined by CPSC personnel.  As a pilot, it has worked well.  The agency now seeks to extend the program to all imports under its jurisdiction.  Such a program will be expensive and the agency has asked Congress for a significantly increased appropriation to build out the program and the authority to impose user fees on importers as a way to fund the program on a continuing basis.

The agency has a great deal of regulatory housekeeping to do before such a system is feasible.  The program will only work if the agency has the statutorily-required certificates of compliance from importers available in an electronic form.  These electronic certificates will provide the basic information to allow both the CPSC and its sister agency, Customs, to make initial judgments about compliance.  In 2013, the agency proposed to update its rules governing the creation and filing of e-certificates (at 16 C.F.R. §1110).  Unfortunately, the agency, in a good example of “wants” exceeding “needs”, proposed a rule that goes well beyond what is required by the statute, and, if finalized, would require importers to redesign reporting systems and impose many new and costly requirements.  I looked at the cost of the proposed system when I was a Commissioner and using agency estimates, determined that it would cost annually over $400 million – that is almost $1/2 billion—for importers to compile the paperwork to document tests and generate the certificates that reflect those tests. That is a lot of money for paper!

This rule has been one of the most controversial in the history of the agency.  Many comments have been filed and most of them have been critical of the proposed rule.  The agency now proposes to establish a pilot program to see if the rule will work.  Unfortunately, rather than establishing a pilot based on the learning found in the comments to the rule, the pilot will look much like the proposed rule.  And because it is so tied to the expanded import surveillance system, this rule remains on the agency’s near-term agenda for completion.

At the hearing last week, several commissioners discussed the agency’s import surveillance activities.  Chairman Kaye argued that seeking authority to expand its import surveillance activities is consistent both with Congressional desires expressed in the CPSIA and with the Presidential direction for closer coordination among agencies that handle imports.  However, the ever-thoughtful Commissioner Beurkle pointed out that the agency has yet to undertake a requirements analysis to identify the capabilities of an expanded system.  Both she and Commissioner Mohorovic expressed grave concerns about the status and substance of the agency’s proposed rule on electronic certificates with Commissioner Mohorovic suggesting that the agency was greatly underestimating the number of certificates that it would have to process. He also argued that the agency has yet to demonstrate how the rule would improve targeting of violators and suggested that a “trusted trader” program should be part of any final program.    Commissioner Beurkle suggested that an “incremental” approach to building out the system was a more prudent one than what the agency proposed.

While the Senate Committee did not dwell on the subject of user fees, there were differences of opinion both on the Committee and among the commissioners.  Again, Chairman Kaye voiced strong support for the notion of user fees to fund import surveillance activities while Commissioner Beurkle expressed concerns about the wisdom and the constitutionality of such a system.

It seems pretty apparent that the agency has much more planning to do before it should get the permits to build out this addition to its regulatory house.  The fact that so much of the planning and preparatory work that needs to proceed such a program is still “under construction” should give policy makers pause.  And the issue of how to fund the program does raise many policy issues.  User fees have a certain attractiveness and have been used before.  But the policy and legal implications of such an option should be more fully explored.  In this regard, last month the George Washington University Regulatory Studies Center published a study looking at the on-budget cost of regulations.  Among other things the study found that “in general, agencies that are at least partially funded by fees on the entities they regulate continue to grow at a faster rate than those that depend on appropriations from general funding” and that “agencies with independent funding authority will have significant increases in their outlays over the two-year 2015-2016 period.”  While this may or may not be a bad or a good result, it is something that should be understood before Congress, the agency and its stakeholders go down this road.

Planning is important.  It appears that the agency needs to work on its blueprint before it jumps into this new undertaking, not matter how important.

Advertisements

Import Workshop–Searching for Answers

Since 2008, consumer product manufacturers and importers have been required by law to certify that their products meet applicable safety standards. The CPSC now proposes to answers sign_Resized_300x239require the electronic filing of those certificates with Customs and Border Protection (CBP) prior to import and to expand the information that must be included on the certificates.  At a workshop two weeks ago, the agency explained its proposal and heard from various stakeholders about the impact of its proposal.

The workshop certainly gave participants much substantive information. But it also left the distinct impression that there is much misunderstanding of the proposal among the various parties, much misinformation within the agency about many aspects of the import process, and much back-to-the-drawing-board analysis that needs to be done before this proposal goes live.

The session started with the agency explaining the need for the proposal.  While the agency did not exactly say, “we are from the government and we are here to help you,” the agency did say that the intent of the proposal was to facilitate trade and make the import process more efficient as the agency carries out its regulatory function.

The agency then heard from importers who told it in some detail how its proposal grossly underestimated the numbers of certificates that would need to be processed and the burden and costs of complying.  They questioned the need to change a system that was working now to target unsafe cargo and criticized the lack of flexibility in the proposed system.  Common carriers and custom brokers noted that they had no way of efficiently taking on the burden of filing certificates since they had no knowledge of applicable regulations or products.

Several other government agencies that have certification programs discussed their experiences but it was obvious that those programs are of a narrower scope or not apposite to what is being proposed by the CPSC.  The CBP asserted, in spite of what stakeholders had earlier said about CBP’s capabilities, that it was ready to handle the data that would be coming in from the electronic filing of certificates, although, should those certificates come in PDF form, that might cause a hiccup.

Finally at the end of the presentations, several pragmatists from the audience suggested that the agency rethink its objectives, giving concrete suggestions for simplifying the approach the agency was taking.  The meeting concluded with vague suggestions of a pilot program sometime in the future.

What the agency did not address at the workshop was how this proposal relates to its current budget request to Congress for millions of dollars to expand its risk assessment methodology (RAM) project to cover all imports under its jurisdiction and its proposal to charge importers user fees to pay the down-stream costs of this expansion.  Obviously electronic filing of certificates is a required first step before the expanded RAM and user fees can be put into place.

It may be that expansion of the RAM to assess the risk of all imports in the way the agency proposes makes sense.  Or it may be that an expansion can be better accomplished, if it needs to be done, by a staged process.  Perhaps user fees assessed against importers to pay for the system is the fairest way to assure that those whose products are subject to the system pay for it.  On the other hand, virtually everyone imports these days so user fees have a taxation aspect to them that needs to be considered.  These are all questions that the agency has not asked stakeholders.  Instead they will be debated through the appropriations process in the Congress. Rather than the agency first trying to educate and then get consensus on important policy issues, real potential for divisive debate now exists.

Would not the agency have been wise to tee up some of these important issues for discussion as well?  Many people asked why the agency wants to change a system that seems to be working well.  They deserve the full answer.

It Will Take More Than A Workshop

In an apparent fit of good sense, the CPSC staff has announced a workshop to explore with stakeholders issues presented by its proposal to require that importers of electonicfilingcabinetproducts under its jurisdiction file electronic certificates of compliance with CPB prior to importation.  This electronic filing requirement was only one of many controversial proposals found in the agency’s notice of proposed rulemaking to amend 16 CFR 1110 dealing with certifications of compliance.  The agency received many comments to the NPR, almost all of them very critical of the proposed amendments.

Here are the specifics as announced by the agency.  The workshop will be held on September 18 at the agency headquarters in Bethesda, MD.  Those who wish to present needed to notify the agency by August 8, so the dogs and the ponies have already been chosen.  If you wish to attend in person, as opposed to viewing the webcast, you must notify the agency before September 5.  However, if you wish to file written comments, you may do so before October 31.

It is pretty clear, both from the number and tenor of the comments received and from the announcement of the workshop itself, that the agency is really struggling with the details of implementing an electronic filing system.  No doubt part of the struggle comes from the fact that the agency is trying to do way too much in the proposal.

For example, the current pilot-scale RAM (risk assessment methodology) program allows the CPSC to analyze CBP import data to identify high risk cargo for inspection.  The agency seeks to expand this pilot program and apply the RAM analysis to all imports under its jurisdiction and sees electronic filing as essential to this expansion.  Perhaps a more gradual roll-out would be a more rational approach.  As another example, the NPR seeks to support the President’s Executive Order 13659 calling for the modernization and simplification of the trade processing infrastructure, but again, the details of the NPR add complexity rather than simplicity.  Many comments made the point that CPB processes do not align with the NPR requirements and will not for some time, if at all.  And there is still no explanation why common carriers are being required to take on the legal burden of filing certificates when they have no way of policing their accuracy.

The staff recognizes that the proposal presents both practical and logistical problems and asks for suggestions and solutions for solving those problems.  My advice to those participating is to honor this request.  While the agency staff is very good at many things, here they are operating in waters where they are not expert.  Unfortunately, the staff also listed a number of issues that are off the table for discussion during the workshop.  Many of those items touch on the topic of electronic filing so, by walling off the topic in this narrow way, the staff may not get the value they need from this exercise.  (Of course this is the same approach that was taken in the recent workshop on phthalates determinations.)

It is pretty apparent that it is going to take more than just a workshop for the agency to come up with a sensible proposal that works efficiently within the bigger trade processing picture.  It is unfortunate that the collaboration that use to exist between stakeholders and the agency has been so weakened over the past several years, because honest dialog between trusted partners is what is needed to solve the many problems in the NPR.  An ongoing effort, organized by a trusted third party with trade expertise, could perhaps work through the many issues raised by the comments so that what comes out of the process is–to paraphrase Mick Jagger—not necessarily what the agency wants but what the agency needs.

 

 

CTAC: A Bull’s-Eye on Effective Import Strategy

Recently, I had the chance to visit the Department of Homeland Security’s Commercial Targeting and Analysis Center—CTAC. I met with both CPSC staff who work there and the U.S. Customs and Border Patrol staff they work alongside. CTAC was established 4 years ago to coordinate information sharing among agencies responsible for the safety of imports. Through this effort, the CPSC and CBP have been able to leverage their knowledge about products and companies to better target potentially hazardous products and stop hazardous ones from reaching store shelves.

Sharing information and priorities among multiple federal agencies helps both consumers and the regulated community: the coordination makes our efforts more effective and efficient, meaning that we can police more imports with the same staff. At the same time, CTAC (and other developments being pursued by DHS and CBP) should enable importers to reduce the number of redundant forms they must complete and shorten the time that legitimate trade is slowed before entering the American market. Based on what I saw and heard, it is clear that both the CPSC and CBP have learned a lot from each other since CTAC started, and we stand to learn a lot more, especially as other federal agencies increase their engagement.

Importing Good Ideas

Over the past couple weeks, my staff and I have had several opportunities to engage with manufacturers, importers, laboratories, safety experts, and our domestic and international peers. I like to attend these programs because I always walk away with a broader understanding of how our actions are working in the real world and how we can improve.

I could overflow this space with observations and insights from all our stakeholders. One takeaway from a meeting I recently attended that I believe is especially worth highlighting is the success of our cooperation with our colleagues at U.S. Customs and Border Patrol, and how that joint effort is enhanced by CBP’s importer outreach programs. I would like to see CPSC take a look at what our peer agencies are doing and see what lessons we can learn to improve our own interactions with the regulated community.

For example, CBP is developing a “one-stop shop” approach for importers to make the customs clearing process more accessible and efficient. This program uses teams co-located in subject-specific centers to work with importers at multiple ports, rather than sending them to a different contact at each port. In addition to providing consistent advice, this also helps CBP staff identify good citizens and bad actors more quickly to help focus resources on the areas of greatest need.

I would like to see CPSC refocus its efforts to make compliance less of a guessing game (which includes making sure the rules are readable for non-lawyers), so that the companies who make and sell safe products can do so with minimal distraction from their actual business. We need to do some hard work so that our regulatory climate is one in which companies feel comfortable asking questions and reaching out to us before molehills grow into mountains. And when problems are identified, we must be willing to roll up our sleeves and do the hard work involved in finding workable solutions.

Moreover, particularly during the lingering budget uncertainty, we need to be more diligent about focusing on real risk. We should focus our limited resources on willfully violative companies, inherently dangerous products, and vulnerable populations, not on minor filing mistakes. Pure paperwork violations—due more often to confusing rules than to bad intent— might need correction, but they simply don’t require the same attention. Every dollar we spend checking off forms is one we can’t spend spotting real unreasonable risks of harm.

Ports Report

Last week I was in New York to talk with the United States Association of Importers of Textiles and Apparel. We discussed importers’ responsibilities for testing and certification as well as the status of several ongoing regulatory proceedings of special interest to importers. The group was keenly interested in these issues as importers are especially impacted by many of our new regulations, and they are eager to “get it right.”

I also had the chance to meet with officials from both Customs and Border Protection and several ports. I was pleased but not at all surprised to hear their praise of the CPSC staff at the ports who are working tirelessly alongside Customs agents to stop dangerous products before they hit store shelves. The ongoing close cooperation that has developed between the CPSC and Customs since our Import Surveillance Division was established in 2008 is a real success story for both agencies. Port officials also gave the agency gold stars for cooperation. Kudos to all our staff, CBP, and the ports for their professionalism and dedication to making consumers safer.


Enter your email address to subscribe to my blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 969 other followers

Archives

RSS CPSC Breaking News & Recent Recalls

  • An error has occurred; the feed is probably down. Try again later.

Let’s keep the conversation going on Twitter. You can find me at @NancyNord.

Nancy's Photos

  • 85,351 visits
Advertisements