Archive for the 'Nancy Nord' Category

Commissioner Mohorovic Will Be Missed

Commissioner Joseph P. Mohorovic has announced that he will be resigning from the CPSC effective Friday, October 20.

Much has been said – and will continue to be – about Commissioner Mohorovic’s service on the Commission. He brought an extraordinary intellect, a mountain of practical experience, a great sense of humor, and an unreserved eagerness to hear from all sides on all issues. The Commission was better for his presence, and it will be diminished by his absence.
What won’t be diminished is the marked tendency of a majority of the current  Commission to impose its political will regardless of what anyone else – Congress, consumers, data, or CPSC’s own staff – has to say on any given matter. We’ve seen that hubris on display on two notable recent occasions. First, the Commission voted to convene a Chronic Hazard Advisory Panel (CHAP) to look into organohalogen flame retardants, while clearly telling the CHAP what opinion they expect it to form, not only through Commissioners’ rhetoric but also through a pre-judgment conclusory “guidance” document published in the Federal Register–all of this contradicting advice from the agency staff. Second, just this week, the Commission majority decided to ignore clear scientific evidence that demonstrated that not all phthalates are the same and to ban even the most innocuous ones because chemicals sound scary and because they are politically compelled to be angry at Exxon (a maker of phthalates) all the time.
I suspect that now, with a 3-1 majority and lock-step voting, what comes out of the CPSC in the next weeks or months will advance a particular political agenda but will have little to do with science, data, or even safety.   But we’ve also seen CPSC’s hubris come back to bite it, as I wrote a couple weeks ago.  I sincerely hope that Commissioner Mohorovic’s departure gives the White House and the Senate some added impetus in not only nominating and confirming his replacement, but also in confirming the current well-qualified nominee and a permanent chairman.
New blood brings new ideas and points of view.  As we have seen from the dogmatic and politically driven but not very thoughtful decisions of the last few weeks, the CPSC is is desperate need of a transfusion.
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The Price of Hubris

Late last week, the CPSC community received one of its rarest gifts: A judicial opinion in a litigated civil penalty case. Judge William Conley of the U.S. District Court for the Western District of Wisconsin calculated the penalty Spectrum Brands owed for failing to report handles breaking off of Black & Decker SpaceMaker coffee pots and for selling 641 units after they had been recalled. The time Judge Conley took (over seven months) was surprising; the result was stunning. While the government argued that the maximum penalty of $30.30 million could be assessed for the two separate violations, Judge Conley determined that a much smaller number was appropriate: $821,675 for the failure to report and $1.115 million for the sale of recalled goods.

Pundits of CPSC enforcement policy will devour every morsel of the Spectrum case and I’ll be eager to read their work. But what I find most compelling is the extent to which this result highlights what, for the last eight years, has been the defining characteristic of CPSC’s attitude toward the companies it regulates: Hubris.

Judge Conley wrote that CPSC “failed to establish” the severity of the alleged defect, “introduced no admissible evidence regarding any injuries that a consumer actually sustained,” and “offered no evidence with respect to either [a history of non-compliance or a failure to respond to inquiries],” two factors CPSC calls out in its penalty rules. In short, CPSC phoned in its argument. The agency was so persuaded by the merits of its own position that it assumed Judge Conley would defer to its inherent – and, presumably, inerrant – wisdom.  Instead the trier of fact put the agency through its paces and demanded proof that the other side was as guilty as CPSC asserted it to be.

The agency’s arrogance is hardly new. In 2009, the CPSIA’s ten-fold penalty cap increase kicked in. Since then, CPSC’s political leaders have urged staff to drive penalty settlement totals ever higher, with little regard for tethering any penalty to the merits of the case. Last year, at the annual symposium of the International Consumer Product Health and Safety Organization (ICPHSO), then-Chairman Elliott Kaye called for a “double-digit millions” penalty. Mere weeks later, his attorneys delivered a $15.45 million settlement with Gree Electric Appliances, Inc. It is hard to escape the narrative of the then-Chairman driving for bigger numbers for the sake of bigger numbers.

At the same conference as Kaye’s “double-digit millions,” CPSC’s Office of General Counsel asserted that, because any product sold in any quantity could technically be subject to a maximum penalty, any demand below that already represented a magnanimous compromise on the agency’s part. Of course, if that had been Congress’ intent, there would have been no need for either statutory factors or a requirement for CPSC to interpret them, but this wasn’t enough to keep CPSC from expecting companies to be grateful any time it didn’t kick them quite as hard as it could. Bottom line is that the penalty amounts demanded by the agency have been steadily going up, with no attempt to link each higher penalty to more egregious behavior.

Chairman Buerkle and Commissioner Mohorovic consistently, but so far unsuccessfully, have been arguing for a penalty policy that is something more than “bigger is better.”  Now the court in Spectrum has agreed, going through a rigorous analysis of how the statute and the regulations should be applied to come up with a penalty amount.  Of course, this analysis is what the agency should have been doing all along but was not. Instead the agency seems to be convinced that its word is gospel, any penalty number it might choose to name is justifiable, and the only ones complaining are the companies who care nothing about their safety obligations.

The CPSC expects everyone else to accept this caricature without question. And for some time, that assumption has been correct. Companies have been quick to settle and slow to criticize, calculating that the fight isn’t worth winning.  However, CPSC’s blinkered compulsion to squeeze harder is encouraging more resistance. As one example, CPSC is currently litigating another failure-to-report penalty case against Michaels Stores–for not rushing to inform the agency that glass breaks.

Spectrum and Michaels may well see themselves members of a growing club of companies who are pushing back against the CPSC’s imperiousness. They are reminding us that, sometimes, the only way to deal with a bully is to punch back. If it doesn’t sincerely examine its own flawed, self-important assumptions, CPSC can expect to take more punches from companies and from courts. And, like all victims of hubris, it will have only itself to blame.

Remembering John Byington

It was with real sorrow that I learned of the passing earlier this month of S. John Byington, the former chairman of the CPSC.  Like many others in the product safety world, I counted John as a true friend who was always ready to provide valued advice and counsel.

A pharmacist and a lawyer by training, John brought a respect for both law and science to the agency.  As chairman from 1976 through 1978, during the early years of the agency when it was easy to demagogue issues, he insisted that the agency have a strong basis in both science and the law before tackling the important issues before it.

John was a man of many interests.  After leaving the CPSC, his career included not only traditional law practice but also a number of entrepreneurial pursuits as varied as starting a microbrewery and a leading legal recruiting firm, LegalLeaders.  I had lunch with John earlier this year and, as always, marveled at his enthusiasm for life and his willingness to reach out with friendship and caring to those around him.  He made important contributions to product safety and will be missed.

A Few More Bites at the Apple

Next week the CPSC Commissioners will hold a hearing on whether to grant a petition to ban a wide range of consumer products containing organohalogen flame retardants (OFRs).  The petition, filed in 2015, is overly board and seeks to treat in the same way a wide class of chemicals that differ one from another. It seeks to ban a broad range of consumer products with OFRs that vary in use and exposure patterns. It seeks a ban in spite of the fact that the scientific data to justify this action is, charitably, sketchy at best. For these and many other reasons, the petition, on its face, presents sufficient reason for denial.  (See here.)

Nevertheless, the agency held a hearing on the petition in late 2015, put it out for public comment, and has devoted a considerable amount of staff resource to considering the issues presented by the petition.  After a thorough examination of the data in the petition, the hearing record and the public comments, in May the agency staff recommended that the petition be denied for a variety of reasons.  In spite of all this, the Commissioners apparently do not believe that they have sufficient information to make up their minds on the matter and so are having yet another hearing.

It is not clear what this hearing is intended to accomplish, other than to give the petitioners another chance to explain why the agency staff was in error in its conclusions. Presumably some Commissioners will offer helpful hints on how to recast the petition to avoid the shortcomings identified.  Perhaps there will be some conversation about why the petitioners brought the issue to the CPSC when it is more properly before the EPA.  No doubt some on the dais will decry the statutory requirement to balance risks with costs, a requirement the petitioners cannot come close to meeting.

While the hearing will be interesting, one wonders why the agency has devoted such a significant level of resource to this activity.  If the Commissioners vote to overrule their staff and grant the petition, then the level of activity required for rulemaking would have the agency busy for years to come.  If the Commissioners agree with the staff and vote to deny the petition, then what was the point of the hearing?  Among other things, it certainly raises questions about the stewardship of public resources.

 

Saw Hearing Shows Need to Sharpen CPSC Regulatory Tools

 

Last week the CPSC held a hearing to address its pending proposed rule to require active injury mitigation (“AIM”) technology on table saws.  In recent years, too often CPSC hearings have devolved into little more than theater, obviously intended to generate press but little understanding of the complex issues the agency is so often called upon to decide. Last week’s hearing was different.  For much of the hearing, the Commissioners were actually discussing the complex regulatory issues the NPR presents and doing it in a knowledgeable, engaged and interested manner.

To recap, the proposed rule would require that all table saws use the AIM technology to help prevent the 33,000 injuries that occur each year from use of these saws. Such technology can detect human contact with the saw blade and stop the saw before that contact occurs.  However, the only available technology that meets the standard is owned, patented and being sold by one table saw producer, a company called Saw Stop.  Because Saw Stop has so many patents, the agency recognizes that it is unlikely that other technology that would not violate those patents could be developed to meet the proposed standard. While the technology owner states that he is willing to license it to the rest of the industry, he is unwilling to enter into a legally-enforceable commitment to do so either with a voluntary standards organization or before a mandatory rule is finalized.  By mandating AIM, the agency will both create a monopoly and significantly increase the price of the saws.  The agency recognizes that both will occur.

The agency has to grapple with a number of important issues.  Obviously, the AIM technology would reduce the number of serious injuries associated with the product and addressing those injuries is a priority for the agency.  However, the technology is currently in the marketplace and available to consumers who wish to pay for it. Is it the proper government role to require people to buy technology that they have determined they do not wish to pay for?  Should the CPSC, a safety agency, be concerned about the market distortions its rules may bring about?  Everyone, including the CPSC, anticipates that the rule will result in significant price increases. Will those increases create disincentives for consumers to buy new  AIM-equipped saws, with the result that old saws will stay in use longer than expected and injuries will increase, at least in the short run? Has the agency’s analysis of the costs and benefits of the rule correctly considered these issues?

These are all serious questions and it is good that the agency is giving them serious thought.  The agency has now received comments from the George Washington University Regulatory Studies Center. These comments to the proposed rule look at the way the agency did its required cost-benefit analysis and finds that there is room for improvement.  The methodology the agency uses for such analyses has not changed in years; nor has it received much critical review.  Since both analyzing regulatory costs and benefits and regulating in the least burdensome way that effectively addresses safety concerns are mandated by the law, this analysis should be a more important regulatory tool than it has been in practice.

The GW comments show sufficient weaknesses in the analysis to raise questions about the validity of the conclusions the agency reaches.  For example, the agency may be overstating the benefits of the rule given the lack of detail in the injury incident data the agency relies on.  (The shortcoming in the data has also been recognized by the Commissioners who have directed the staff to develop more data.)  The agency’s estimates of the societal costs are also predicated on suspect data and open to challenge, as the report points out. The GW study not only finds fault with the agency’s analysis of potential benefits of the proposed rule but also its disregard for the negative impact market distortions may have on consumers.  It concludes that if the “CPSC finalizes these standards it is more likely to produce a market failure by creating a monopoly than to address an existing one.”

Given the concerns raised by the GW comments and by others, one can rightly ask whether it is good policy for the agency to create a monopoly on the basis of flawed data.  And even if the data is good, one still must ask whether creating a monopoly is appropriate government regulatory behavior. Considering the serious and important policy questions this proposed rule presents, the Commissioners are right to give it a more thorough evaluation than what has occurred to date.

 

 

 

 

 

Tell CPSC What You Think

One of the very positive hallmarks of the new leadership at the CPSC is a desire to hear from all interested stakeholders on how to more effectively push forward the agency’s safety mission. The agency has offered several opportunities for input and for those of us who share that goal, these opportunities should not be ignored.

First, the agency will be conducting a workshop on ways to improve the recall process, including the effectiveness of recalls.  Recall effectiveness is a perennial topic of conversation at the agency so it is gratifying that the agency is again looking at this topic, but hopefully from a new perspective.  Both as a Commissioner and now, in private law practice, I often hear complaints about the opaqueness of the process. Participation in the workshop offers an opportunity to give real suggestions on how to make the recall process work better.  The workshop will be held on July 26, 2017 at the agency headquarters in Bethesda.  Those interested in participating must sign up with the agency no later than July 3.  Here is more information about the workshop.

Second, the agency is requesting comments on ways to reduce the regulatory burden imposed by agency rules in ways that do not diminish safety.  This effort is especially welcome since many of the regulations issued by the agency over the past eight years did not consider ways to accomplish safety goals in less burdensome ways.  When Congress told the agency to try to find ways to reduce the burden of testing, the agency went through a fantasy effort to comply and, not surprisingly, came up with very little.  Indeed, about the best it could do was exempt from testing toys made entirely from untreated wood from the trunks of trees (but not the branches—who knows what could be in branches!).  (See here.)

Reducing unnecessary regulatory burden is important since this engenders respect and support for the agency. Rules that are outdated, overly complex, or impose requirements without regard to real and measurable safety results should be identified and either changed or repealed.  The agency’s effort to collect information on burdens imposed by its regulations is a welcome first step in this process.

 

Fighting the Magnet Wars

 

This morning I watched the oral arguments before the CPSC in the staff appeal of the ALJ’s decision in the Zen Magnets case.  I felt as if I was watching World War One trench warfare in modern dress.  And like trench warfare where the combatants refuse to give an inch, insisting on holding their positions, what we saw this morning was both wasteful and futile, made worse by a predetermined outcome.

To recap, this morning’s exercise was the latest in the long running battle between the CPSC and Zen Magnets which sells small rare earth magnets (“SREMs”).  The agency argues that the magnets are defective because small children can ingest them with resulting severe injuries.  In addition, the agency argues that the magnets are “toys” and violate the toy safety standard which prescribes how powerful magnets used in toys can be.  The agency brought an administrative action to recall the magnets but the administrative law judge who heard the case did not buy the CPSC’s arguments. Instead, he found that the magnets were not defective when accompanied with proper warnings and age restrictions and that the toy standard does not apply to such magnets. The agency staff does not accept this determination and instead appealed it to the Commission—the same body that voted to bring the administrative action in the first place.  I have not found even one person who believes that a majority of the Commissioners will not vote to overturn the ALJ’s decision and order a recall.  At that point, the order will be final agency action and ripe for judicial review.

The ALJ’s decision is not the only skirmish on this subject that the agency has lost.  At the end of last year, the Tenth Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals overturned a federal safety standard issued by the Commission which effectively banned the sale of SREMs by restricting the permissible strength and size of the magnets. The court found that the agency failed to properly address the degree of the risk posed by the product and also the utility of the product.  As a result of these shortcomings, the court overturned the rule. A majority of the Commissioners have now voted to re-propose the rule to correct the deficiencies identified by the court—in other words, beef up the record but still ban the product.

Today’s hearing covered a lot of ground.  For example, even though the agency put incident data into the administrative record, the staff sidestepped shortcomings found in the data (since the incidents could not be attributed to Zen), indicating that no injuries or incidents are needed to support a defect finding.  There was a great deal of discussion about the role of consumer misuse, and the adequacy of warnings and labels.  The Commission asked about the applicability of the toy standard to a general use product

While this all may be interesting to students of martial arts or administrative law, what should be of concern is that consumer safety has gotten lost in these protracted battles—and this must be laid at the doorstep of the agency.  Putting Zen Magnets out of business—which seems to be the objective of the exercise—will not stop SREMs from getting into the hands of consumers.  By shutting down the remaining U.S. company that has aggressive warnings and marketing practices that minimize children’s exposure to the product, the agency leaves the field open to the many other companies, based outside the U.S., that are now selling the product without warnings—and without any interference from the CPSC.

If the agency had spent the resources that it has devoted to this case to looking at what is now going on in the market, rather than seeking to stop the leading proponent of safe and responsible magnet use and who is seeking to bring better safety awareness to the industry, it would be fulfilling its safety mission.  If the agency had accepted the many offers that have been made to educate the public on magnet safety, it would be fulfilling its safety mission.  Instead, it just feels like the agency is fighting a grudge match—what a waste!

The futility of the agency’s position is also maddening.  The magnet recalls that have been done resulted in a dismal return rate.  In other words, the public likes the product—not just because it is very cool but also because it has high utility as an educational, creative and artistic product. While the agency discounts these uses, the public does not.  What the agency has not done and refuses to do is consider whether there are any ways to reconfigure the packaging, beef up the warnings, put in place marketing restrictions, and engage in education efforts so that the public can have access to the product with safety considerations part of the equation. It has done this with other products that present much greater risks to children—button batteries, for example. However, this would require the agency to get out of the trenches and this it refuses to do.  So the magnet wars continue into the future and real consumer safety is the main casualty.

 

 

 

 


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